AAAM 2015

This week I am attending the Association of African American Museums annual meeting in Memphis, TN. It is one of my favorite conferences to attend. Great locations, wonderful activities, and interesting and practical presentations. Most important, though, great people. Like oral historians, museum professionals are engaging people who like to work with the public (for… Continue Reading AAAM 2015

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Finding the Digital Humanities

While popular retelling likes to place the origins of the “digital humanities” with John Unsworth and the entitling of the volume, A Companion to Digital Humanities, the term has earlier origins and DH first began appearing in 1998.  The term is often associated appropriately with one of the pioneers in digital projects, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). In November of… Continue Reading Finding the Digital Humanities

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Oral History and Digital Humanities

All fields in the humanities have been transformed by digital technology, but none more so than oral history.  The new book, Oral History and Digital Humanities: Voice, Access, and Engagement, published by Palgrave Macmillan, explores the impact that new technologies have had on the field.  Edited by Doug Boyd and Mary Larson, the essays in the… Continue Reading Oral History and Digital Humanities

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DH and CC

I have been asked recently to think about the relationship between the Digital Humanities and Community Colleges.  I realized that this would be a daunting task, but my first inter-institutional DH project was with several community colleges in Michigan.  In the end, how do we think about DH in resource challenged institutions and with overworked… Continue Reading DH and CC

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Lost in the Digital Wilderness: A Perpetual Jerimiad

I was distracted by a thoughtful jeremiad, “How Long will People Read History Books?” written by William Cronon for the President column of the October 2012 issue of Perspectives on History. It bemoans the fact that the digital age is one of “impatience” and “distractedness” and that the computational maw will ground to dust the… Continue Reading Lost in the Digital Wilderness: A Perpetual Jerimiad

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Oral History in the Digital Age

Oral History in the digital Age is launched. The OHDA project represents a partnership between MATRIX, the Michigan State University Museum, the Smithsonian Institution Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, the Library of Congress’ American Folklife Center, the American Folklore Society, and the Oral History Association. Seven interdisciplinary working groups composed of experts and practitioners from museums, libraries, and scholarly… Continue Reading Oral History in the Digital Age

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